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Poster: Capt. Cook Date: Aug 2, 2010 11:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Jerry Movie Announced..

A story about a young garcia is not nearly as thrilling an adventure as a story about the late-60's/early-70's Garcia who sat at the wheel of a spaceship entering charts and territories unknown. The Bluegrass Jerry of the 1950's is eh.... I guess I gotta watch it, but boy to be a Fly on the wall during the Acid Tests and to put THAT into film. Yea a much richer film experience would have been had by all!!!

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Poster: buscameby Date: Aug 2, 2010 2:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: speaking of films about the 60's

I watched an interesting but slow movie about Neal Cassady this weekend.

It was on the Independent Film Channel I believe. I think the best part was the revelations about his relationships with Kessey and Jack K.

I think they ran out of money like many Indy films because it kind of cut in the last 15 minutes.

There was little to no info on his relation to the Boys directly more inference by the hippies hangin round. It was kind of interesting historically I guess. Only about 75 minutes long so no burnin a lot of time because its a short sad story.

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Poster: mickmac Date: Aug 2, 2010 6:22pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: speaking of films about the 60's

ive had conversations with a relative of Mr casady. The comment that was made was it was so early in the bands career noone knew what they had.success was never projected into the future.it was all in the moment. This post was modified by mickmac on 2010

This post was modified by mickmac on 2010-08-03 01:22:55

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Poster: Capt. Cook Date: Aug 2, 2010 3:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: speaking of films about the 60's

I really like The Monterey Pop Festival Film from the concert. Has some great onstage footage as well as tons of backstage interviews and just hanging around video of the era.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monterey_Pop

Gimmie Shelter is an equally outstanding if darker view of the scene. The GD are there and pretty funny. The Rolling Stones are exposed and the view is not kind...

Alot of the cable channel documentrys of the era are just rejurgitations of network news BS of the time. Its rare to find an honest look into the era maybe because the times were so expolsive. Todays youth are passive to the extreme compared with those kids...

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Poster: buscameby Date: Aug 2, 2010 4:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: speaking of films about the 60's

Funny you mention Monterey, I recorded it the same night to put on DVD, I'm not keeping the Neal program, its not a doc but more a docudrama.

If only those two clowns Adler and Phillips didn't get credit for the movie, gee he gets paid and f*cks his own daughter-- wonder where the karma is there.

This post was modified by buscameby on 2010-08-02 23:09:54

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Aug 2, 2010 7:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: speaking of films about the 60's

I also think the Monterey Pop film is great, one of my favorite sixties films - should've been twice as long... But it was only meant to be a sampler. Pretty good song selection, for the most part. (There's a lot to be said for conciseness, but even so, the unwritten law that live-music documentaries couldn't be more than 90-min or so has always bugged me. At least it uses mostly complete songs, and there were a lot of bonus extras on the Criterion reissue.)

I think a lot of the quality comes from DA Pennebaker's hand at the helm. It uses a lot of the 'new' experimental/cinema-verite documentary techniques that started in the sixties (no narration, 'subjective' camera-style, etc). But you're mistaken about there being "tons of backstage interviews"...there are, in fact, none in the film, as Pennebaker didn't believe in them. I wish he had gotten into the audience & behind-the-scenes stuff more, rather than taking an 'outsider' viewpoint and not talking to anyone. (The cameramen pay special attention to every pretty girl in the crowd! And it's funny how the camera never leaves Grace Slick during the Airplane's segment...)

This film probably had an impact on how the Woodstock documentary was made - that film was much longer, and did have more interviews and a look at the youth scene. (Of course, Woodstock was seen as a huge event even at the time. I think the quality of the Monterey festival might only have been realized in hindsight, after some of its new stars became famous. At the time, Janis, Jimi, and the Who were unknowns, and Otis would die 6 months later.)
I wish I'd been at Monterey, whereas with Woodstock I'm content just to see the film....
http://www.dvdjournal.com/reviews/c/completemontereypop_cc.shtml